Ecommerce Blog

How delivery posts on social media influence online shoppers

Ecommerceweek.co.uk has released the results of the UK Consumer Home Delivery Survey 2014 by IMRG, showing more than half of online shoppers could have chosen a retailer based on comments about delivery left on their social networks.

The sixth annual survey conducted by the online trade body shows that as many as 35% of respondents said they were definitely influenced by posts left on websites such as Facebook and Twitter, with 20% saying they were possibly influenced.

Head of e-logistics at IMRG, Andrew Starkey stated, “Any negative perception about a retailer’s delivery offer will not just affect existing customer loyalty but also customer acquisition. To enhance that experience, apart from cost and service quality, consumers are looking for choice.”

The research questioned over 550 households in the UK and revealed an increase in concerns over the ability to find delivery information prior to order and align with the ability to find returns information.

It concluded that the results are more likely to be driven by increased consumer expectations rather than retailers failing’s in offering the information, which means that retailers need to do more to provide timely delivery and returns information.

Starkey added, “Even though satisfaction levels are steady above 82%, we should remember that we operate in a digital environment, where close to 100% performance is expected and so there still a long way to go although signs are encouraging.”

Chief executive of home delivery and mobility technologies provider Blackbay, Nigel Doust, observed the results and revealed that the industry is at an important crossroads.

“In order to meet the needs of consumers it must provide a transparent, flexible and cost-effective delivery model that ensures not only first time delivery, but one that delivers optimal customer service,” said Doust.

“Technology is available through solutions like Blackbay to enable this; however both the e-retailer and carrier must collaborate in order to achieve this”.

The survey also found that consumers are reluctant to pay a premium for alternative delivery locations, delivery information etc., and that the same is true in respect of premium services.

Shoppers’ attitudes toward the additional price they are prepared to pay have hardened, with 41% saying the maximum premium they would pay for a timed delivery slot was £1, compared with 27% just a year ago. The exception to this is at Christmas, where consumers may be prepared to pay a little more (up to £3) to assure delivery in time for Christmas.

 

Author: Tony Bury is an Online Marketing Expert at ekmPowershop.com, the UK’s leading hosted eCommerce website solution.